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Emergency Situations

  • There are many potential hazards that pets face especially during the holidays. With commonsense and planning, exposure to these hazards can be avoided preventing injury or illness. Hazards include tinsel, electrical cords, string from meat, ribbons, Christmas tree water, holiday plants such as mistletoe, holly, and lilies, and food, such as chocolate. Some cats will do better if given a safe space to stay away from company and may require calming remedies to help minimize anxiety and stress during the holidays.

  • There are many potential hazards that pets face especially during the holidays. With commonsense and planning exposure to these hazards can be avoided preventing or illness. Hazards include tinsel, electrical cords, string from meat, ribbons, Christmas tree water, holiday plants such as mistletoe, holly, and lilies, and foods such as chocolate and other human foods including bread dough. Some dogs will do better if given a safe space to stay away from company and may require calming remedies to help minimize anxiety and stress during the holidays.

  • Birds are naturally mischievous and if not properly supervised, will get into many predicaments. It is crucial that you bird proof your home. The bird's cage is its house and the confines of your home represent the bird's environment.

  • Many think that because cats are finicky eaters they are poisoned less often than dogs. However, with their curiosity and fastidious grooming, intoxication is, unfortunately, not uncommon. Several factors predispose cats to becoming ill once they have been exposed to even a small amount of a poisonous substance.

  • If you saw a person have a seizure or fall down the stairs or wreck a car, what would you do? You'd call 911. But what should you do when the crisis involves your pet? You call a pet emergency number. Ask your veterinary hospital how they handle after-hour emergencies.

  • Hypertension, or high blood pressure, in cats can be a debilitating condition if not treated promptly. Hypertension may be caused by kidney disease, hyperthyroidism, or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Your veterinarian will recommend the best treatment options for your cat based on her specific needs. Prognosis is variable depending on how well these other conditions are controlled.

  • Hypokalemia is a term that refers to a low blood concentration of potassium. Potassium is an important electrolyte within the body and is vital for the normal function of muscles and nerves. Mild to moderate hypokalemia often does not cause clinical sigs, but severe hypokalemia can result in generalized muscle weakness, lack of appetite, and some dogs may become constipated. The underlying cause of hypokalemia is often chronic kidney failure. Hypokalemia and its associated clinical signs may be quickly corrected by potassium supplementation. Depending on the cause, it may be necessary to continue supplementing potassium permanently.

  • Ibuprofen is a commonly used NSAID and is used to treat fever, pain, and inflammation in humans. Ibuprofen poisoning occurs when a cat ingests a toxic dose of ibuprofen, either through misuse or by accident. Ibuprofen poisoning causes many different clinical signs because many different organ systems can be affected. Most commonly, cats show signs related to kidney problems.

  • Ibuprofen is a commonly used NSAID and is used to treat fever, pain, and inflammation in humans. Ibuprofen poisoning occurs when a dog ingests a toxic dose of ibuprofen, either through misuse or by accident. Most commonly in dogs, clinical signs related to irritation and ulceration of the gastrointestinal tract are observed including decreased appetite, vomiting (sometimes with blood), diarrhea, depression, abdominal pain, dark tarry stools, and bloody stools.

  • Icterus is also known as jaundice is an excessive accumulation of a yellow pigment in the blood and tissues, most easily seen in the gingivae and sclerae. Icterus can be caused by hemolysis, liver disease, or obstruction of the bile duct. Your veterinarian will perform screening tests to determine the root cause of icterus. Based on the preliminary tests, your veterinarian may recommend fine needle aspiration, needle biopsy, or a surgical biopsy. Icterus will resolve once the underlying disease is identified and treated. The prognosis depends on the underlying cause.